All posts filed under: StudynWorks

Connected Brains – Oct 2015

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Neuroscience / StudynWorks

Gu S, Satterthwaite TD, Medaglia JD, Yang M, Gur RE, Gur RC, Bassett DS. Emergence of system roles in normative neurodevelopment. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Oct 19. pii: 201502829. [Epub ahead of print] Comment: Brain networks consist of different modules or subnetworks that are activated during various cognitive tasks. In this large study of 780 subjects between 8-22 years the authors show that modules display a characteristic pattern of development which is related to […]

The hubs of the human connectome are generally implicated in the anatomy of brain disorders

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Neuroscience / StudynWorks

Brain networks or ‘connectomes’ include a minority of highly connected hub nodes that are functionally valuable, because their topological centrality supports integrative processing and adaptive behaviours. Recent studies also suggest that hubs have higher metabolic demands and longer-distance connections than other brain regions, and therefore could be considered biologically costly. Assuming that hubs thus normally combine both high topological value and high biological cost, we predicted that pathological brain lesions would be concentrated in hub […]

A Deep Learning Tutorial: From Perceptrons to Deep Networks

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StudynWorks

In recent years, there’s been a resurgence in the field of Artificial Intelligence. It’s spread beyond the academic world with major players like Google, Microsoft, and Facebook creating their own research teams and making some impressive acquisitions. Some this can be attributed to the abundance of raw data generated by social network users, much of which needs to be analyzed, as well as to the cheap computational power available via GPGPUs. But beyond these phenomena, this resurgence has been powered […]

A Potential Role of the Curry Spice Curcumin in Alzheimer’s Disease

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Neuroscience / StudynWorks

There is substantial in-vitro data indicating that curcumin has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-amyloid activity. In addition, studies in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) indicate a direct effect of curcumin in decreasing the amyloid pathology of AD. As the widespread use of curcumin as a food additive and relatively small short-term studies in humans suggest safety, curcumin is a promising agent in the treatment and/or prevention of AD. Nonetheless, important information regarding curcumin bioavailability, safety […]